History of the club





News and events



Game on Saturday,September 20th,2014 vs. New Haven, Conn.
580 Newhall Street, Hamden,CT. 06517










The AGM will be held on Feb 1! See calendar for details!








St. Brendan's annual Christmas party has been rescheduled from Dec. 14 to Dec. 22 due to inclement weather! Please see calendar for details!








Fall season is over! U12 and 14 had great semi-final games, but didn't get to go on... Thank you to all who helped this season so great.








Good luck to U12 and U14 in the semi-finals Nov. 2!







Hope to see everyone at the game on Saturday. Good luck to all.

Founding president Stephen O'Shea

Saint Brendan's Gaelic Football Club was named after the Patron Saint of County Kerry, Ireland. Stephen O'Shea formerly from County Kerry, had a dream that is now being realized. Thanks to him and eight others who joined this venture the ball started rolling. It must be emphasized here, the contribution of ladies who became involved who were the catalyst to really make things happen. They did so with energy, their enthusiasm their ideas, their commitment to a game that they intuitively knew, would serve the youth of their Orange County communities. Stephen's dream began taking shape but without a field how was reality to be realized. Coming to the rescue, were visionary Town Board members from the neighboring town of Blooming Grove. Yes, a town bordering Monroe, which Stephen and wife Cathie, and their friends regard as their "HEROES." Truly amazing folks.

Continuing on, Stephen, now a resident of Monroe, can be credited with a first. The history of Monroe will likewise be enhanced and can lay claim with pride to his contribution. It should be noted that Stephen's long interest in, and love of Gaelic activities in the county of his birth and carried over to the New York region. This was the catalyst that led him with encouragement of his lovely wife Cathie to start a Gaelic Football club for the children of his community. Gaelic football is a wonderful game, it is played among the youth of Erin and is becoming increasingly popular by youth in other lands.

Stephen's began his project by attempting to secure a pitch to play on. This coupled with the number of young players yet to be realized was not conducive to exciting backers. Stephen and wife Cathie had to be creative if they were to obtain the requisite backing in support of Stephen's dream. Needless to say, as is usual, nothing came easy, they were not having much success until Cathie suggested that they describe the game as Gaelic (as it, really is) and not as Irish football. This coupled with the large numbers of eager youth who signed on, they went forth and viola! met with the success they sought.

Even with the field and necessary backing in hand, much still needs to be done. Hopes are high that kids through age 12 (initially) will be enjoying a level of Gaelic Football competitiveness beginning in March 2002. Saint Brendan's teams have begun training, individuals are honing their skills for next year engagements, already. Americans tend to like reasonably high scoring games, as like baseball, they like the come from behind aspect, like that of a grand slam homer. Gaelic football provides for similar dramatic turnabouts. A ball between the uprights (over the bar) is worth one point, but if the ball finds the net (under the bar) its a goal, and worth three points. A score at the end of a game might appear where Team A scored points, 0-17 (no goal scored) and Team B with 2-10, in which case, Team A won by one point.

Congratulations! to Stephen and committee members, a dream that became a reality.
Good Luck.

St. Brendan

Source: New Advent

St. Brendan of Ardfert and Clonfert, known also as Brendan the Voyager, was born in Ciarraighe Luachra, near the present city of Tralee, County Kerry, Ireland, in 484; he died at Enachduin, now Annaghdown, in 577. He was baptized at Tubrid, near Ardfert, by Bishop Erc. For five years he was educated under St. Ita, "the Brigid of Munster", and he completed his studies under St. Erc, who ordained him priest in 512.

Between the years 512 and 530 St. Brendan built monastic cells at Ardfert, and at Shanakeel or Baalynevinoorach, at the foot of Brandon Hill. It was from here that he set out on his famous voyage for the Land of Delight. The old Irish Calendars assigned a special feast for the "Egressio familiae S. Brendani", on 22 March; and St Aengus the Culdee, in his Litany, at the close of the eighth century, invokes "the sixty who accompanied St. Brendan in his quest of the Land of Promise". Naturally, the story of the seven years' voyage was carried about, and, soon, crowds of pilgrims and students flocked to Ardfert. Thus, in a few years, many religious houses were formed at Gallerus, Kilmalchedor, Brandon Hill, and the Blasquet Islands, in order to meet the wants of those who came for spiritual guidance to St. Brendan.   Having established the See of Ardfert, St. Brendan proceeded to Thomond, and founded a monastery at Inis-da-druim (now Coney Island, County Clare), in the present parish of Killadysert, about the year 550.

He then journeyed to Wales, and thence to Iona, and left traces of his apostolic zeal at Kilbrandon (near Oban) and Kilbrennan Sound. After a three years' mission in Britain he returned to Ireland, and did much good work in various parts of Leinster, especially at Dysart (Co. Kilkenny), Killiney (Tubberboe), and Brandon Hill. He founded the Sees of Ardfert, and of Annaghdown, and established churches at Inchiquin, County Galway, and at Inishglora, County Mayo. His most celebrated foundation was Clonfert, in 557, over which he appointed St. Moinenn as Prior and Head Master. St. Brendan was interred in Clonfert, and his feast is kept on 16 May.   Voyage of St. Brendan   St. Brendan belongs to that glorious period in the history of Ireland when the island in the first glow of its conversion to Christianity sent forth its earliest messengers of the Faith to the continent and to the regions of the sea. It is, therefore, perhaps possible that the legends, current in the ninth and committed to writing in the eleventh century, have for foundation an actual sea-voyage the destination of which cannot however be determined. These adventures were called the "Navigatio Brendani", the Voyage or Wandering of St. Brendan, but there is no historical proof of this journey.

Brendan is said to have sailed in search of a fabled Paradise with a company of monks, the number of which is variously stated as from 18 to 150. After a long voyage of seven years they reached the "Terra Repromissionis", or Paradise, a most beautiful land with luxuriant vegetation. The narrative offers a wide range for the interpretation of the geographical position of this land and with it of the scene of the legend of St. Brendan. On the Catalonian chart (1375) it is placed not very far west of the southern part of Ireland. On other charts, however, it is identified with the "Fortunate Isles" of the ancients and is placed towards the south. Thus it is put among the Canary Islands on the Herford chart of the world (beginning of the fourteenth century); it is substituted for the island of Madeira on the chart of the Pizzigani (1367), on the Weimar chart (1424), and on the chart of Beccario (1435). As the increase in knowledge of this region proved the former belief to be false the island was pushed further out into the ocean. It is found 60 degrees west of the first meridian and very near the equator on Martin Behaim's globe. The inhabitants of Ferro, Gomera, Madeira, and the Azores positively declared to Columbus that they had often seen the island and continued to make the assertion up to a far later period. At the end of the sixteenth century the failure to find the island led the cartographers Apianus and Ortelius to place it once more in the ocean west of Ireland; finally, in the early part of the nineteenth century belief in the existence of the island was completely abandoned. But soon a new theory arose, maintained by thos scholars who claim for the Irish the glory of discovering America, namely, MacCarthy, Rafn, Beamish, O'Hanlon, Beauvois, Gafarel, etc. They rest this claim on the account of the Northmen who found a region south of Vinland and the Chesapeake Bay called "Hvitramamaland" (Land of the White Men) or "Irland ed mikla" (Greater Ireland), and on the tradition of the Shawano (Shawnee) Indians that in earlier times Florida was inhabited by a white tribe which had iron implements.

In regard to Brendan himself the point is made that he could only have gained a knowledge of foreign animals and plants, such as are described in the legend, by visiting the western continent. On the other hand, doubt was very early expressed as to the value of the narrative for the history of discovery. Honorius of Augsburg declared that the island had vanished; Vincent of Beauvais denied the authenticity of the entire pilgrimage, and the Bollandists do not recognize it. Among the geographers, Alexander von Humboldt, Peschel, Ruge, and Kretschmer, place the story among geographical legends, which are of interest for the history of civilization but which can lay no claim to serious consideration from the point of view of geography. The oldest account of the legend is in Latin, "Navigatio Sancti Brendani", and belongs to the tenth or eleventh century; the first French translation dates from 1125; since the thirteenth century the legend has appeared in the literatures of the Netherlands, Germany, and England. A list of the numerous manuscripts is given by Hardy, "Descriptive Catalogue of Materials Relating to the History of Great Britain and Ireland" (London, 1862), I, 159 sqq. Editions have been issued by : Jubinal, "La Legende latine de S. Brandaines avec une traduction inedite en prose et en poésie romanes" (Paris, 1836); Wright, "St. Brandan, a Medieval Legend of the Sea, in English Verse, and Prose" (London, 1844); C. Schroder, "Sanct Brandan, ein latinischer und drei deutsche Texte" (Erlangen, 1871); Brill, "Van Sinte Brandane" (Gronningen, 1871); Francisque Michel, "Les Voyages merveilleux de Saint Brandan a la recherche du paradis terrestre" (Paris, 1878); Fr. Novati, "La Navigatio Sancti Brandani in antico Veneziano" (Bergamo, 1892); E. Bonebakker, "Van Sente Brandane" (Amsterdam, 1894); Carl Wahland gives a list of the rich literature on the subject and the old French prose translation of Brendan's voyage (Upsala, 1900), XXXVI-XC.

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